Future Challenges

Personal Realities of Globalization

0 notes

Governments are not embracing early warning systems as a measure that would
help reduce the risk of famine, says a report, titled Managing Famine Risk:
Linking Early Warning to Early Action, by  the Chatham House . Yet, studies
show that food crises are not black swans but are subject to early warning
systems and tools.

Rob Bailey, Senior Research Fellow at Chatham House, a UK think-tank, said
the risk to famine is rising although funding to curb this has increased
because most of it goes to humanitarian cause. The report argues that early
warning system tools, weather forecasts, are way to go in curbing famine to
increase food security.

[image: Inline image 1]

(Bailey gives his presentation during the Searchlight Conference [Photo by
Mubatsi])

Decision makers (politics) have a major role to play in ending famine but
the problem is they deny food crises exist in their backyards since such
crises are globally viewed as leadership failure. Just like it was the case
in 2011, the report argues that Somalia Ethiopia, and Kenya are most at
risk to famine.
However, some critics of the report say it misses to capture the role
communities can respond to famine and food crises. Women in Africa are the
majority smallholder farmers and the report does not capture their
thoughts. The report more focuses on the role of politicians.

In response Rob Bailey, Senior Research Fellow at Chatham House, says
community knowledge on early warning tools towards famine and drought
should be utilized to feed in the contemporary methods. James Ogor,
executive director Kenya National Drought Authority, says focus should be
integrating community resilience to drought and modern ways of resilience
while improving livelihoods of communities facing drought.Climate change
may be responsible for some famine but people should be empowered to
respond to emergency.

Moving forward: Risk financing model by Rockefeller Foundation, World Food
Program and African Union should be adopted by all those that want to
reduce risk of famine. Provide early warning tools and information to
most-at-risk areas. Donors and governments should  build programmes
examining the famine risk areas and help communities.

Food crises are not black swans they happen with our knowledge and
therefore can be avoided. It will take participation of different groups
that include governments, donors, local NGOs, communities and individual
efforts. Solving the risk of famine will take political will. Put people
with best knowledge on the ground to spread early warning messages.

Governments are not embracing early warning systems as a measure that would
help reduce the risk of famine, says a report, titled Managing Famine Risk:
Linking Early Warning to Early Action, by the Chatham House . Yet, studies
show that food crises are not black swans but are subject to early warning
systems and tools.

Rob Bailey, Senior Research Fellow at Chatham House, a UK think-tank, said
the risk to famine is rising although funding to curb this has increased
because most of it goes to humanitarian cause. The report argues that early
warning system tools, weather forecasts, are way to go in curbing famine to
increase food security.

[image: Inline image 1]

(Bailey gives his presentation during the Searchlight Conference [Photo by
Mubatsi])

Decision makers (politics) have a major role to play in ending famine but
the problem is they deny food crises exist in their backyards since such
crises are globally viewed as leadership failure. Just like it was the case
in 2011, the report argues that Somalia Ethiopia, and Kenya are most at
risk to famine.
However, some critics of the report say it misses to capture the role
communities can respond to famine and food crises. Women in Africa are the
majority smallholder farmers and the report does not capture their
thoughts. The report more focuses on the role of politicians.

In response Rob Bailey, Senior Research Fellow at Chatham House, says
community knowledge on early warning tools towards famine and drought
should be utilized to feed in the contemporary methods. James Ogor,
executive director Kenya National Drought Authority, says focus should be
integrating community resilience to drought and modern ways of resilience
while improving livelihoods of communities facing drought.Climate change
may be responsible for some famine but people should be empowered to
respond to emergency.

Moving forward: Risk financing model by Rockefeller Foundation, World Food
Program and African Union should be adopted by all those that want to
reduce risk of famine. Provide early warning tools and information to
most-at-risk areas. Donors and governments should build programmes
examining the famine risk areas and help communities.

Food crises are not black swans they happen with our knowledge and
therefore can be avoided. It will take participation of different groups
that include governments, donors, local NGOs, communities and individual
efforts. Solving the risk of famine will take political will. Put people
with best knowledge on the ground to spread early warning messages.

0 notes

The report us titled : Managing Famine Risk- Linking Early Warning to Early
Action.

The report highlights that recurrent food crises are one of the challenges
that hinder development in the Horn of Africa and Sahel region.

Political risk prefences shape institutions. That could be the reason as to
why countries in Africa do not have Early Warning Systems especially as far
as food security is concerned.

There is need for Institutional Reform so that there are clear Early
Warning systems in African countries.

Capacity of at-risk groups to take early action themselves needs to be
built. There needs to be an enabling environment for the communities that
are risk.

Africa has great capacity to diversify the drought risk.

New approaches need to be taken into a Resilence Lab of sorts that will
help link long and short term goals. This needs a safe space that will help
to build institutions.

The report is supposed to help us look into the future for Africa. To
develop and create a Resilient future for ourselves, Food Security has got
to be looked into. It is  a key area.
Early Warning Systems are what are going to help build a resilent Africa
come 2030 in terms of Food Security.. But the preparation needs to start
NOW.

Ruth Aine.

The report us titled : Managing Famine Risk- Linking Early Warning to Early
Action.

The report highlights that recurrent food crises are one of the challenges
that hinder development in the Horn of Africa and Sahel region.

Political risk prefences shape institutions. That could be the reason as to
why countries in Africa do not have Early Warning Systems especially as far
as food security is concerned.

There is need for Institutional Reform so that there are clear Early
Warning systems in African countries.

Capacity of at-risk groups to take early action themselves needs to be
built. There needs to be an enabling environment for the communities that
are risk.

Africa has great capacity to diversify the drought risk.

New approaches need to be taken into a Resilence Lab of sorts that will
help link long and short term goals. This needs a safe space that will help
to build institutions.

The report is supposed to help us look into the future for Africa. To
develop and create a Resilient future for ourselves, Food Security has got
to be looked into. It is a key area.
Early Warning Systems are what are going to help build a resilent Africa
come 2030 in terms of Food Security.. But the preparation needs to start
NOW.

Ruth Aine.

0 notes

It is a melting pot of heads in Nairobi’s Red Cross Conference Centre.
Grantees of Rockefeller Foundation and Society for International
Development are exchanging ideas about how the future will look like basing
on the challenges at hand. From Asia, Latin America to Africa the
participants in the Searchlight Conference are speaking with optimism about
the future but also cautiously about the risks.

The Nairobi Searchlight conference is the third, the others having taken
place in Mumbai and New York. In this conference the Searchlight partners
will reconnect, learn from each other and synthesize various insights on
the outlook of several countries’ future. Claudia Juech, Managing Director
of Research at the Rockefeller Foundation is hopeful that the grantees will
ably give thoughts which they think will solve future global problems.

The Searchlight aims at bringing grantees together and share their
experiences in solving challenges people face today. “In a way, it is about
grantees’ speculation of future challenges and solutions,” says Claudia.

[image: Inline image 1]

(Claudia during a presentation at the Nairobi Searchlight Conference [Photo
by Mubatsi])

One voice coming from this conference is that technological innovations,
good governance and adaptation to climate change are major solutions to the
future problems. People need to be resilient (adaptive) to change. A common
example cited over and over again  in the conference is the innovation of
sending money to people through the mobile phone (m-pesa) which traces its
roots in Nairobi.

It is being reported here that there are also other largely ignored
innovations in Africa’s technology that should be supported. In Kenya,
there’s a boy who developed solar-powered booby traps to chase  lions that
were attacking his father’s cattle. In many rural African areas cassava
grinding machines have been made. In Uganda, Makerere University students
have made a mobile phone application (WinSenga) that encourages pregnant
mothers to go for antenatal checks. But, the challenge is how do we make
mass production out of these innovations.

Also the conference was told that, in many countries across the world there
is a wind of change blowing in the direction of democracy (Arab spring, in
Latin America, etc), countries are getting interested in regional
integration, there is a boom in infrastructural development, emphasis on
regional markets to promote job creation, creating awareness on climate
change,  etc.These changes need support.

Public private community partnerships are also being emphasized. This is a
good way to go because when one looks at it all; the micro finance schemes
began as community initiatives but are being taken up by the private sector
and banks for support. In Uganda, for example the government (public
sector) is giving drugs to private health centres to treat its citizens
where there are no government hospitals.

However, there is a risk standing in the middle of these innovations. These
seem to be fragmented solutions for problems that should be given bigger
attention. Sometimes you can blame the state; but what is the
responsibility of other actors? There is need to look for solutions beyond
patches.

For example, a sustainable solution can be supporting the universities or
institutions in the ICT to develop software that can be used to disseminate
weather information to farmers through mobile phones, for instance. To be
able to tackle climate change problems we need to invest in human resource
and research that will bring innovative solutions to the farmers. Borrowing
traditional knowledge on how they used to guard against drought, climate
change could be another.

But again, a couple of questions still linger in mind. Yes, technology has
its good side like when people use it for showing their power. However, in
the event that government tries to block it as seen in China, how will
people use it? Have we built resilience to government interference with
technology? It is good news from Asia where women leaders are rising, but
are women leaders better?

Latin America is reported to be experiencing huge rural-urban migration
putting pressure on existing structures like housing; are cities able to
cope? Who stands to benefit from regional integration? Young population in
Africa, will be growing very high compared to aged population in developed
countries; how will Africa cope with lack decent jobs for youths as seen in
Arab spring in Tunisia, Egypt? How can South, East, West Africa collaborate
with North Africa e.g. in terms of security, development, climate change,
etc?

Well, the conference is underway. Hopefully by at the end, we will have
concrete solutions to future challenges and predictions of the future in
Asia, Africa, Latin America.

It is a melting pot of heads in Nairobi’s Red Cross Conference Centre.
Grantees of Rockefeller Foundation and Society for International
Development are exchanging ideas about how the future will look like basing
on the challenges at hand. From Asia, Latin America to Africa the
participants in the Searchlight Conference are speaking with optimism about
the future but also cautiously about the risks.

The Nairobi Searchlight conference is the third, the others having taken
place in Mumbai and New York. In this conference the Searchlight partners
will reconnect, learn from each other and synthesize various insights on
the outlook of several countries’ future. Claudia Juech, Managing Director
of Research at the Rockefeller Foundation is hopeful that the grantees will
ably give thoughts which they think will solve future global problems.

The Searchlight aims at bringing grantees together and share their
experiences in solving challenges people face today. “In a way, it is about
grantees’ speculation of future challenges and solutions,” says Claudia.

[image: Inline image 1]

(Claudia during a presentation at the Nairobi Searchlight Conference [Photo
by Mubatsi])

One voice coming from this conference is that technological innovations,
good governance and adaptation to climate change are major solutions to the
future problems. People need to be resilient (adaptive) to change. A common
example cited over and over again in the conference is the innovation of
sending money to people through the mobile phone (m-pesa) which traces its
roots in Nairobi.

It is being reported here that there are also other largely ignored
innovations in Africa’s technology that should be supported. In Kenya,
there’s a boy who developed solar-powered booby traps to chase lions that
were attacking his father’s cattle. In many rural African areas cassava
grinding machines have been made. In Uganda, Makerere University students
have made a mobile phone application (WinSenga) that encourages pregnant
mothers to go for antenatal checks. But, the challenge is how do we make
mass production out of these innovations.

Also the conference was told that, in many countries across the world there
is a wind of change blowing in the direction of democracy (Arab spring, in
Latin America, etc), countries are getting interested in regional
integration, there is a boom in infrastructural development, emphasis on
regional markets to promote job creation, creating awareness on climate
change, etc.These changes need support.

Public private community partnerships are also being emphasized. This is a
good way to go because when one looks at it all; the micro finance schemes
began as community initiatives but are being taken up by the private sector
and banks for support. In Uganda, for example the government (public
sector) is giving drugs to private health centres to treat its citizens
where there are no government hospitals.

However, there is a risk standing in the middle of these innovations. These
seem to be fragmented solutions for problems that should be given bigger
attention. Sometimes you can blame the state; but what is the
responsibility of other actors? There is need to look for solutions beyond
patches.

For example, a sustainable solution can be supporting the universities or
institutions in the ICT to develop software that can be used to disseminate
weather information to farmers through mobile phones, for instance. To be
able to tackle climate change problems we need to invest in human resource
and research that will bring innovative solutions to the farmers. Borrowing
traditional knowledge on how they used to guard against drought, climate
change could be another.

But again, a couple of questions still linger in mind. Yes, technology has
its good side like when people use it for showing their power. However, in
the event that government tries to block it as seen in China, how will
people use it? Have we built resilience to government interference with
technology? It is good news from Asia where women leaders are rising, but
are women leaders better?

Latin America is reported to be experiencing huge rural-urban migration
putting pressure on existing structures like housing; are cities able to
cope? Who stands to benefit from regional integration? Young population in
Africa, will be growing very high compared to aged population in developed
countries; how will Africa cope with lack decent jobs for youths as seen in
Arab spring in Tunisia, Egypt? How can South, East, West Africa collaborate
with North Africa e.g. in terms of security, development, climate change,
etc?

Well, the conference is underway. Hopefully by at the end, we will have
concrete solutions to future challenges and predictions of the future in
Asia, Africa, Latin America.

0 notes

In Africa there is a notion that as we face the future there will be alot of plundering of wealth and resources by the leaders. Do you agree? #SearchLightEA

In Africa there is a notion that as we face the future there will be alot of plundering of wealth and resources by the leaders. Do you agree? #SearchLightEA

0 notes

The main theme for today at #SearchLightEA is: Foresight for Resilience and Equity.

The main theme for today at #SearchLightEA is: Foresight for Resilience and Equity.